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What They Don't Talk About When They Talk About Love

■ Content What They Don't Talk About When They Talk About Love 2013 │ Indonesia、USA │ Fiction│Color│106min│Indonesian Can a blind girl become an actress? And can you play in a punk band if you can’t hear? The inhabitants of a care home for the blind and visually impaired have their everyday concerns, but they also have time for themselves and for their dreams. Their relationships may bring out naive emotions and misunderstandings but there’s always something to learn – perhaps simply that beauty lies in humility. This tender film, whose protagonists are equally inquisitive and immature, doesn’t follow a dramatic line, nor does it promise a plot denouement. Instead it adopts a lyrical mode to guide the viewer through a special world that merits discovery for its intrinsic sensitivity alone. The director, entirely consistent in her approach to the film’s artistic stylization, thus arrives at a unique poetic form whose concept is clear, yet the depiction itself is agreeably ambiguous, even elusive. There is also an air of tranquility and reassurance, as if time were allowing us to indulge in a little luxury. ■ Filmmaker Mouly Surya Mouly Surya has been interested in film and culture since childhood. She took her first degree in media and literature (Swinburne University, Melbourne) and her master’s in film and television (Bond University, Queensland). Her debut Fiksi (2008) screened in its international premiere at the Busan IFF; at Jakarta it won Best Director. Surya is regarded as one of the most promising female directors in the region. Apart from her film work, she is also a teacher in Jakarta, where she lives. Her second feature What They Don’t Talk About When They Talk About Love (2013) world premiered in competition at Sundance, screened at Rotterdam, and played Another View at the 48th KVIFF. Her latest film Marlina the Murderer in Four Acts (2017) was selected by the independent Directors’ Fortnight section at this year's Cannes festival. ■ Product Information Release:Taiwan Women's Film Association Content: What They Don't Talk About When They Talk About Love Format:DVD

Shinjuku Boys

  ■ Content Shinjuku Boys Kim Longinotto / Jano Williams | 1995 | UK | Documentary | Color | 53min | Japanese From the makers of DREAM GIRLS, SHINJUKU BOYS introduces three onnabes who work as hosts at the New Marilyn Club in Tokyo. Onnabes are women who live as men and have girlfriends, although they don't usually identify as lesbians. As the film follows them at home and on the job, all three talk frankly to the camera about their gender-bending lives, revealing their views about women, sex, transvestitism and lesbianism. Alternating with these illuminating interviews are fabulous sequences shot inside the Club, patronized almost exclusively by heterosexual women who have become disappointed with real men. This is a remarkable documentary about the complexity of female sexuality in Japan today. ■ Filmmaker Kim Longinotto Kim Longinotto (born 1952) is a British documentary filmmaker, well known for making films that highlight the plight of female victims of oppression or discrimination. Longinotto studied camera and directing at the National Film and Television School in Beaconsfield, England, where she now tutors occasionally.  Longinotto was born to an Italian father and a Welsh mother; her father was a photographer who later went bankrupt. At the age of 10 she was sent to a draconian all-girls boarding school, where she found it hard to make friends due to the mistress forbidding anyone to talk to her for a term after she became lost during a school trip. After a period of homelessness, Longinotto went on to Essex University to study English and European literature and later followed friend and future filmmaker, Nick Broomfield to the National Film and Television School. While studying, she made a documentary about her boarding school that was shown at the London Film Festival, since when she has continued to be a prolific documentary filmmaker.  Longinotto is an observational filmmaker. Observational cinema, also known as direct cinema, free cinema or cinema verite, usually excludes certain documentary techniques such as advanced planning, scripting, staging, narration, lighting, reenactment and interviewing. Longinotto’s unobtrusiveness, which is an important part of observational documentary, gives the women on camera a certain voice and presence that may not have emerged with another documentary genre. She has received a number of awards for her films over the years, including a BAFTA for her documentary Pink Saris. Jano Williams Jano Williams went to Japan in 1974 intending to stay one year and didn’t come home for 14. While there she worked at the Japanese Broadcasting Corporation NHK, her work involved the making of radio programs about the individuals and structures that make up Japanese society. She subsequently moved to the television company NTV. She learned Japanese and became totally immersed in the Japanese way of life and contributed many articles to Japanese newspapers and magazines. A year after her return to England she went back to Japan with Kim Longinotto to make EAT THE KIMONO (1990) about the radical woman performer Hanayagi Genshu. This was followed by DREAM GIRLS (1993) about the all women Takarazuka Dance Theatre and then SHINJUKU BOYS (1995) about young transsexual men who had been born with women’s bodies. Subsequently she went back to film in Japan for another production company in the course of which she first met the Gaea girls. She is now living in Bristol and hopes to continue making films about the Japan that reflect her bond with that country. (09/09) ■ Product Information Distribution: Taiwan Women's Film Association Content: Shinjuku Boys Subtitles: Chinese/English Format: DVD

Corinne's Secret

  ■ Content Corinne's Secret 2014 ︱Germany ︱ Documentary ︱ Color ︱ DCP ︱ 85min︱German Corinne is a lively 17-year-old student. She cannot wait to leave her Bavarian village and conquer the world. Corinne is HIV-positive, infected by her mother at birth. Her foster parents decided to keep her infection as a secret. Even today, AIDS is still associated with "difficult" milieus. However, Corinne is now ready to reveal her secret. Director Maike CONWAY has accompanied Corinne for more than ten years, revealing her struggles against the virus and for a normal life.   ■ Filmmaker Maike Conway Conway initially worked from 1984 to 1985 as a photo assistant. In 1986, she completed her studies at the Stage School in Hamburg and, a year later, guest auditing at the University of Television and Film Munich. This was followed by an internship in the ARRI recording studios from 1988 to 1989, before working as editing assistant for film and TV as well as film editor for university productions and documentaries. Since 1996 she works as a freelance filmmaker with a focus on documentaries. Her 90-minute documentary Opportunities, for which she wrote and directed the screenplay, was nominated for the Grimme Prize in the Information & Culture section in 2011.   ■ Product Information Distribution: Taiwan Women's Film Association Content: Corinne's Secret Subtitles: Chinese/English Format: DVD

The Day I Will Never Forget

■ Content The Day I Will Never Forget Kim Longinotto | 2003 | UK | Documentary | Color | 92min | English, Swahili, Somali THE DAY I WILL NEVER FORGET is a gripping feature documentary by acclaimed filmmaker Kim Longinotto that examines the practice of female genital mutilation in Kenya and the pioneering African women who are bravely reversing the tradition. In this epic work, women speak candidly about the practice and explain its cultural significance within Kenyan society. From gripping testimonials by young women who share the painful aftermath of their trauma to interviews with elderly matriarchs who stubbornly stand behind the practice, Longinotto paints a complex portrait of the current polemics and conflicts that have allowed this procedure to exist well into modern times.  Demystifying the African tradition of female circumcision, Longinotto presents Nurse Fardhosa, a woman who is single-handedly reversing the ritual of female circumcision one village at a time by educating communities about its lasting emotional and physical scars. Also profiled are an inspiring group of runaway girls who are seeking a court injunction to stop their parents from forcing them to go through with the practice. Through their words the full implications of breaking with tradition are made clear, as is the incredible courage of the women and girls who risk social ostracism by taking a stand against the practice. ■ Filmmaker Kim Longinotto Kim Longinotto (born 1952) is a British documentary filmmaker, well known for making films that highlight the plight of female victims of oppression or discrimination. Longinotto studied camera and directing at the National Film and Television School in Beaconsfield, England, where she now tutors occasionally.  Longinotto was born to an Italian father and a Welsh mother; her father was a photographer who later went bankrupt. At the age of 10 she was sent to a draconian all-girls boarding school, where she found it hard to make friends due to the mistress forbidding anyone to talk to her for a term after she became lost during a school trip. After a period of homelessness, Longinotto went on to Essex University to study English and European literature and later followed friend and future filmmaker, Nick Broomfield to the National Film and Television School. While studying, she made a documentary about her boarding school that was shown at the London Film Festival, since when she has continued to be a prolific documentary filmmaker.  Longinotto is an observational filmmaker. Observational cinema, also known as direct cinema, free cinema or cinema verite, usually excludes certain documentary techniques such as advanced planning, scripting, staging, narration, lighting, reenactment and interviewing. Longinotto’s unobtrusiveness, which is an important part of observational documentary, gives the women on camera a certain voice and presence that may not have emerged with another documentary genre. She has received a number of awards for her films over the years, including a BAFTA for her documentary Pink Saris.     ■ Product Information Distribution: Taiwan Women's Film Association Content: The Day I Will Never Forget Subtitles: Chinese/English Format: DVD

Tick Tock Lullaby

■ Content Tick Tock Lullaby Lisa Gornick | 2007 | USA | Fiction | Color | 73min | English A wry comedy about one of life's biggest decisions – and how the more you have to think about it, the harder it is. Sasha, a cartoonist, is still not convinced she wants to be a mother. Time is ticking by and neither she nor her girlfriend Maya can commit to the idea. Presuming that straight people have it easier, she creates two female characters to investigate various procreative plans. As she draws and invents more, the fiction begins to influence Sasha's experience – or perhaps Sasha is making her anxieties rub off on her characters. What ultimately happens is a result of the poignant but also chaotic urge to create – be it baby or art. ■ Filmmaker Lisa Gornick   Lisa Gornick has made two award winning feature films: Do I Love You? and Tick Tock Lullaby. She has also directed for Channel 4, the award winning film, Dip. She acted in other films including The Owls and Hooters and has performed in her one woman live drawing shows at The Gilded Balloon, Edinburgh Fringe, Soho Theatre, Camden Fringe, JW3, The Poetry Society and The BookClub. Her latest film is The Book of Gabrielle which stars Allan Corduner, Anna Koval and Lisa Gornick. It won the Jury Award and the Audience Award at the Bologna Lesbian Film Festival. Accompanying the film is her first book, How to do it, a sex guide for the warm hearted and also a live drawing show about filmmaking, What the fuck is lesbian film?     ■ Product Information Distribution: Taiwan Women's Film Association Content: Tick Tock Lullaby Subtitles: Chinese/English Format: DVD

Rough Aunties

■Content Rough Aunties 2008|UK, South Africa|Documentary|Color|104 min|English, Zulu Fearless, feisty and resolute, the “Rough Aunties” are a remarkable group of women unwavering in their stand to protect and care for the abused, neglected and forgotten children of Durban, South Africa. This documentary by internationally acclaimed director Kim Longinotto (SISTERS IN LAW, DIVORCE IRANIAN STYLE) follows the outspoken, multiracial cadre of Thuli, Mildred, Sdudla, Eureka and Jackie, as they wage a daily battle against systemic apathy, corruption, and greed to help the most vulnerable and disenfranchised of their communities.  Despite the harsh realities of violence, poverty, and racism in the women’s work at the Bobbi Bear child welfare organization and in the heartaches of their personal lives, the portraits that emerge on screen are filled with grace, wisdom, friendship, and a deeply stirring conviction. Neither politics, nor social or racial divisions stand a chance against the united force of the women. Once again Longinotto has managed to bring us an intimate portrait of change from Africa, this time from post-apartheid South Africa, a nation being transformed with hope and energy into a new democracy.   ■ Filmmaker Kim Longinotto   Kim Longinotto (born 1952) is a British documentary filmmaker, well known for making films that highlight the plight of female victims of oppression or discrimination. Longinotto studied camera and directing at the National Film and Television School in Beaconsfield, England, where she now tutors occasionally.  Longinotto was born to an Italian father and a Welsh mother; her father was a photographer who later went bankrupt. At the age of 10 she was sent to a draconian all-girls boarding school, where she found it hard to make friends due to the mistress forbidding anyone to talk to her for a term after she became lost during a school trip. After a period of homelessness, Longinotto went on to Essex University to study English and European literature and later followed friend and future filmmaker, Nick Broomfield to the National Film and Television School. While studying, she made a documentary about her boarding school that was shown at the London Film Festival, since when she has continued to be a prolific documentary filmmaker.  Longinotto is an observational filmmaker. Observational cinema, also known as direct cinema, free cinema or cinema verite, usually excludes certain documentary techniques such as advanced planning, scripting, staging, narration, lighting, reenactment and interviewing. Longinotto’s unobtrusiveness, which is an important part of observational documentary, gives the women on camera a certain voice and presence that may not have emerged with another documentary genre. She has received a number of awards for her films over the years, including a BAFTA for her documentary Pink Saris.   ■ Product Information Release:Taiwan Women's Film Association Content: Rough Aunties Format:DVD  

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